Universal Entertainment’s Kazuo Okada Ousted from Philippines Casino for Alleged $17 Million Improper Transfer

Universal Entertainment’s Kazuo Okada Ousted from Philippines Casino for Alleged $17 Million Improper Transfer

Japanese slots manufacturer and gaming magnate Kazuo Okada ended up being removed as president from Manila’s Okada Casino in the Philippines on Monday. It was the second place the 73-year-old billionaire has lost in as many weeks, after allegations that he improperly transferred $17.3 million from chichi casino Tiger Resorts Asia in March of 2015 to Okada Holdings.

Kazuo Okada (left, seen right here in 2004 with their bestie that is former Wynn) was ousted as chairman from his Okada Casino in the Philippines this week, being an research into an allegedly improper $17.3 million transfer continues in that country.

Fourteen days prior, he had been relieved as president of Universal Entertainment Corp., the ongoing company he founded that settings both Philippine gambling enterprises.

‘As a consequence of the present actions at Universal Entertainment a special stockholders’ meeting of Tiger Resort was convened followed by the meeting that is organizational of board,’ stated the casino’s press launch. ‘Mr. Kazuo Okada ended up being removed as chairman of the board.’

‘Serious Violation of Governance’

The fraud that is potential uncovered earlier this month and Okada ended up being asked for an explanation as to why $17.3 million was taken from Tiger Resorts Asia and put in a company controlled by Okada and his son. When he could not satisfactorily justify the transaction

Esports Cheating Ban Highlights Corruption Problem in Competitive Gaming

Esports Cheating Ban Highlights Corruption Problem in Competitive Gaming

The Esports Integrity Coalition (EIC), an industry that is non-profit dedicated to cleaning up esports, has prohibited a player for two years after he confessed to cheating during the Mettlestate Samsung Galaxy CS:GO Championship earlier this month.

Connor Huglin, who received a two year ban from competitive esports, after he was discovered to be using software that is third-party cheat in the Mettlestate Samsung Galaxy CS:GO Championship.

It’s the first such ban handed straight down by the EIC’s disciplinary board considering that the organization’s development in britain final summer.

EIC reported that the gamer in concern, Connor Huglin, who played for Armor Legion Gaming under the display screen name ‘zonC,’ accepted a ‘plea bargain,’ after admitting using a third-party software cheat that had gone undetected by Valve’s anti-cheat software.

‘It is constantly disappointing when someone cheats and I am given by it no pleasure to ban a player, but cheating can not be tolerated in e-sports,’ said Ian Smith, ESIC’s e-sports integrity commissioner. ‘It fundamentally undermines the credibility and integrity of our industry. I really hope this demonstrates that ESIC will deal quickly, decisively and proportionately with cheats carrying out a fair procedure.’

Match-fixing Scandal

Does esports have a corruption issue? It’s worth remembering that this might be nevertheless a very young ‘sport,’ and something